Saturday, July 30, 2016

VISHTEN AT THIS YEARS PHILLY FOLK FEST




Look for my interview/ feature with Vishten at this years Philly Folk Fest coming soon!

THE WOOD BROTHERS AT THE 2016 PHILLY FIOLK FEST





 Look for my interview/ feature with The Wood Brothers at this years Philly Folk Fest coming soon!

BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE AT THE 2016 PHILLY FOLK FEST




Look for my interview/ feature with Buffy Sainte-Maries at this years Philly Folk Fest coming soon!

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

PLEASE KEEP THE GREAT SHARON JONES IN YOUR PRAYERS!

http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/podcasts/7439167/soul-sisters-podcast-sharon-jones

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

GET YOUR TICKETS FOR CHRIS ROBINSON (The Black Crowes) AT THE SELLERSVILLE THEATER 7/28/16



The Black Crowes’ Rich Robinson
thriving as a solo Artist

By Rob Nagy

“It’s never an easy decision to walk away from your life’s creation,” says Black Crowes guitarist and co-founder Rich Robinson, from New York City, referring to the official end of the group. “My whole adult life I was in that band making music and that’s what I did.  It afforded me a really cool life. You could see how people were moved by what we did. We would play songs and it would be a release and people would weep and you could see joy and connection. There’s nothing better on earth than that. That’s the whole point of being in a band.”

“As time went on,” adds Robinson, “For whatever reason, this power struggle ensued with Chris where he just wanted to take over and I really didn’t want to go where he was going. I didn’t believe in it, and that became very stressful. When the two people that were working in unison for years and knew what we could do together and all of a sudden that shifts, and he’s going down a road that I do not like at all musically where he’s coming from, and he didn’t like what I was doing -  it just got to this point where it was so stressful and miserable that we all hated making records.”

Formed in Marietta, Georgia with his brother, lead vocalist Chris Robinson, The Black Crowes earned critical praise and commercial success with the release of their Platinum selling debut album, “Shake Your Money Maker” (1990). The singles “Twice As Hard,” “Hard to Handle” and “She Talks to Angels” received heavy radio airplay. Their follow-up Platinum album, “The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion” (1992), featuring the hit single “Remedy,” became their highest charting album in the U.S. and abroad.

By the mid 90’s, the Black Crowes (who had continued to tour at a feverish pace, headlining shows and festivals in both Europe and Japan) reached the pinnacle of their commercial success. A loyal fan base continued to follow the band in spite of their declining popularity.

After the release of the album “Lions”(2001) and concert tour, the Black Crowes took an indefinite hiatus. Rich Robinson seized the opportunity to pursue solo and collaborative efforts, recording and performing with his bands Hookah Brown and Circle Sound.

In January 2005, Rich and Chris Robinson joined each other on stage for the first time since 2002, performing an acoustic show in Las Vegas.  In the months to come, the Robinson’s performed a series of concert dates, “Brother’s of a Feather,” capturing one of their shows at the Roxy in Los Angeles for a CD/DVD release.

Rumors that the Black Crowes were reuniting surfaced a couple of months later. The band then hit the concert trail, headlining throughout the U.S. and Canada, guest appearing with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and then at the Bonnaroo Music Festival. A late summer five night run at the Fillmore in San Francisco was captured on film and released as a live CD/ DVD, “Freak ‘n’ Roll Into The Fog” (2006).

On the surface, the future of the Black Crowes looked promising, yet internal dissension was growing within the band.

“Early on when we would make records,” says Robinson, “it was always great because our roles were defined. My role was music and Chris’ was lyrics, and that’s really how it went. And then the band came in and played what they played and they were such great players. It wasn’t until later when the horse---t would come in.”

“What contributed to the end of the Black Crowes was more like ego,” adds Robinson. “The environment was really negative - not the band.  It was coming from one source. It created a tremendous amount of negativity. To me, if you didn’t want to be in the band anymore and if you were bitter or whatever and you didn’t feel like it moved you anymore, I think you have to take into consideration the fans. Those people have been there with us the whole time and those people have an invested interest as well. Why not do at least a string of shows - one last tour and then just go away. Everyone would go into it knowing that this is done. Let’s have a celebration, not unlike “The Last Waltz.” So now it’s kind of freeing to be away from that and to just be in a more positive place.”

In spite of his disappointment over the demise of the Black Crowes, Robinson continues his journey of rebirth and discovery.

Robinson shines on his latest solo effort, “Flux” (Eagle Rock Entertainment, 2016). Offering a 13 song collection of what might be his finest solo work to date, Robinson is backed by a stellar line-up of musicians, including Matt Slocum (keys), Marco Benevento (keys), Danny Mitchell (keys) Zak Gabbard (bass), Joe Magistro (drums/percussion), and vocalists John Hogg and Danielia Cotton. “Music That Will Lift Me” is the record’s first single.  The album showcases Robinson’s ability to deliver straight ahead rock and roll as well as emotionally charged, heart felt, thought provoking composition. Other stand-out tracks include “The Upstairs Land,” “Everything’s Alright,” “Life,”  “Astral” and “Time to Leave.”

“I think it’s a progression, the next step,” says Robinson. “I really didn’t go in with anything.  I just had parts.  I’m thinking, ‘Well, I want to use the energy of the studio.’ We went ahead and just started doing it. I love the concept of flushing out these things while they’re happening. To me, the process is seeing this one small piece of music and then literally throughout the day seeing where it goes. Trying different beats, different riffs, adding this and that, and it’s really cool.  I like to work with broad strokes and also with feeling.  ‘How does this make me feel? Where is this going?” Those are the things that I really look at when I write. We get in there and really just do it and there’s really nothing better than that.”

Robinson, who currently splits his time by playing guitar for Bad Company on their 2016 U.S. co-headlining tour with Joe Walsh, is excited to perform songs off his latest release on his own solo concert dates.

“I’m really looking forward to getting out and playing and doing my thing,” says Robinson. “I really love my records and I love playing them live, and I really love my band. There are really no decisions to be made.  We just get out there and play. It doesn’t have to be anything. It’s just there in front of us. It’s like when we’re in the studio. ‘Hey what do you think? What’s your part going to be?’ It’s just normal back and forth. We’re all there for one purpose - to play this music.”

“It’s been a few years of trying to convince people that I’m not trying to be the Black Crowes,” adds Robinson. “Crowes fans tend to want the Black Crowes. It can open some doors, but it can also shut them as well when people just want the Crowes. So there are pros and cons. It would be just really cool to have people come out and check us out and give it a chance. I think it’s good and hopefully you’ll like it.”

Rich Robinson will perform at the Sellersville Theater; located at 24 West Temple Ave., Sellersville, PA, Thursday July 28, 2016 at 8:00 P.M. Tickets can be purchased by calling 215-257-5808 or on-line at www.st94.com.

To stay up to date with Rich Robinson visit www.richrobinson.net.


GET YOUR TICKETS FOR "QUILT" AT THE FILLMORE (Philly) 7/29/16



Quilt Releases Pop Infused “Plaza”

By Rob Nagy

Out of New England comes the four-piece psychedelic indie rock band “Quilt.” Featuring Anna Fox Rochinski (vocals/guitars), Shane Butler (vocals/guitars), Keven Lareau (vocals/bass) and John Andrews (vocals/drums), Quilt’s latest album release “Plaza” (2016) represents the evolution of one of the more interesting bands to emerge in recent years.

Influenced by a variety of musical genres dating back to the late 60’s, Quilt delivers a polished presentation of their avant-garde style on “Plaza.” Offering what Andrews considers a selection of straight up pop, Plaza delivers a collection of well-crafted songs featuring tantalizing harmonies, cool guitar riffs and dreamy synthesizers. Standout tracks include “Passersby,”  “Searching For,” “O’Connors Barn,” “Something There,” “Padova”  “Your Island” and “Own Ways.”

“We thought, ‘how are we going to make a record while living so far apart?’” says Andrews, from his home in Barrington, New Hampshire. “We weren’t living near each other anymore. So we all flew to Atlanta, Georgia for about a month together and just worked on songs. Then we had a week in upstate New York when we finalized a lot of the songs before we went in the studio to record in Brooklyn New York. The last record was our first time working in a professional studio. Having had some experience, we got through the awkward part of figuring out what we were going to do in the studio. We were more comfortable this time. It was a fun time.”

“While every song is different, we all, for the most part, write together in one way or another,” adds Andrews. “We used to improv a lot, just jamming together and coming up with stuff that way. This time people wrote individual parts and we regrouped and we sat with them and worked together.  It was very much a collective effort between the four of us to write the songs.”

“As a songwriter, there’s a magical moment when a song that starts in your head becomes verbal when you’re singing it and then goes through a microphone and onto a record and back into the air and then goes into someone else’s head,” says Andrews. “It’s like this never ending stream of thought when people make or listen to music, and we’re all part of it.”

Formed in 2008 by Rochinski and Butler while the pair attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Quilt made its first SXSW festival appearance in 2010.  Following their “Agents of Play” EP release in 2010, the band was signed by Burger Records. Releasing their self-titled debut album in 2011 (which featured the single “Cowboys in the Void”), the record was later picked up and rereleased by Mexican Summer Records.

Garnering praise from critics and attention from indie music fans, Quilt followed up with a sophomore effort, “Held in Splendor,” in 2014.

Extensive touring throughout the U.S. and Canada found the band sharing the concert stage with “Young Magic,” “The Fresh & Onlys” and Laetitia Sadier. Quilt made its national television debut in the fall of 2015 by appearing on NBC’s late night entertainment program, "Last Call with Carson Daly.”

Rapidly becoming seasoned veterans of the road and the recording studio, Quilt’s merging of unique vocal harmonies, skilled musicianship, improvisation and visual presentation have resulted in a memorable live show and a growing cult following.

“We all sing,” says Andrews. “We all had our bands and projects before and we were all the singers of those bands.  So, it only made sense for us to all sing. I think we blend very well together.  We work a lot on harmonies. We try to incorporate what’s on the records, the songs that people recognize and hear. We also try to incorporate some jamming and improvisation. I know I can’t speak entirely for the group, but I’m a big Grateful Dead fan. They are the kings of the jam. It’s a balance between satisfying yourself and satisfying the audience. So jamming is a way of keeping the audience satisfied and keeping yourself satisfied. We also include a visual element to our show. It seems to work pretty well ‘cause everyone comments on how much they like the visuals.”

“I couldn’t be happier,” adds Andrews. “We’ve had a very gradual growth. We’ve been a band for a while. We put our time in playing shows to nobody and in basements and weird bars and stuff. We’d done that for a long time. We have a modest cult following. We’ve been able to support ourselves playing music and that’s the dream. We’re all very optimistic for the future.”

Quilt performs with special guest Mary Lattimore at the Fillmore (Foundry), 1000 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19125, Friday July 29, 2016 at 8:00 P.M. For further info or tickets, visit www.livenation.com.

To stay up to date with Quilt, visit www.quiltband.com.

http://www.tickettoentertainment.com/blog/2016/07/20/concert-preview-quilt-releases-pop-infused-plaza/






GET YOUR TICKETS FOR ISRAEL NASH AT MILKBOY (PHILLY) 7/27/16


Sunday, July 17, 2016

ISRAEL NASH RETURNS TO PHILLY 7/27/16





Philly Favorite Israel Nash
Returns to the City of Brotherly Love

By Rob Nagy


It has been a decade since Israel Nash arrived in New York City to pursue his dream of making music his life’s work. Armed with an acoustic guitar, a harmonica and his raw, edgy songs, Nash feverishly worked the clubs on the Lower East Side.  The singer-songwriter was signed to his first contract by the Dutch label Continental Record Services following the release of his independent debut solo album, “New York Town,” in 2009.  It wasn’t until his follow-up album, “Barn Doors and Concrete Floors” (2011), that audiences started to take notice.

Enlisting the talents of Joe McClellan (lead guitar), Aaron McClellan (bass) and Eric Swanson (bass, mandolin and banjo), the foundation of what has become Nash’s recording and touring band, “Barn Doors and Concrete Floors” was well received by critics and fans.  This sophomore release earned Top Album of 2011 on the Euro Americana Charts.

“I really think that finding those guys and having them become such dear friends really encouraged me to write differently,” says Nash, from his recording studio in Dripping Springs, Texas. “I was used to playing solo shows with an acoustic guitar and a harmonica and trying to pull that off in a way that was compelling. When I got the band, it wasn’t ‘Oh, we can make these songs bigger and stronger and more powerful.’  The band was so good together that they challenged me. I could write deeper stuff and go to other places because they could help me bring it to life. That really changed my songwriting.”

“When I brought those guys to Europe for the first time and we played “Barn Doors,” my second album, we just killed it live. I just knew.  I don’t know how to explain it.  I just knew that there was something very special about what we did together, and it was bigger than any individual.”

Securing a foothold in Europe, success on American soil eluded Nash until the U.S. release of his critically acclaimed “Rain Plans” album in 2014.

“I had started my career in Europe,” says Nash. “I did two albums before “Rain Plans,” and it happened that my fan base was in Europe. “Rain Plans” was released in Europe, but it came out here a year later. We were finally getting to a place here in the States where my music was being listened to at home.”

“I don’t think it’s as easy to have success as an artist here as it is in Europe,” says Nash. “I don’t think people are blind to it in the States, but I do think music and the arts have been appreciated culturally in Europe for a lot longer period of time. There’s something different in general about the culture and how the arts have taken a priority. Realizing that art is something that is needed, but that it might not always yield the biggest returns financially, the culture in Europe has understood that it’s very important. It’s the idea that good art should be supported and shared.”

Often compared to Neil Young owing to similarities in his vocal style, song structure and electrifying stage presence, Nash is flattered by the comparison.

“I’m a big fan of Neil Young,” say’s Nash. “I am attracted to his approach and knowing what he wants to do - songs that are real and feel like they matter. You look at his body of work and it’s really hard to define. His output as an artist rather than just his output as a songwriter is visionary stuff. That’s what I find myself pretty attracted to.”

“What I hope to achieve in time is to transcend the genres,” adds Nash. “I’m not an artist that wants to make the same album every time. Over time it becomes genre-less. That’s my goal as an artist.”

Having recently completed construction of his home recording studio, Plum Creek Sound, Nash has begun work on a new album, the follow-up to last year’s “Silver Season.”

“It’s really just starting to unfold,” says Nash. “I’m just writing and recording demos right now. I’ve got 6 or 7 new songs. I don’t really know where it’s going, but I know the process has changed now that I’ve got a studio, which is much more of a tool or an instrument to make the next record. We have the fall and the winter pretty much off, so we plan on working on the album. Maybe it will be out by next summer. I’m really looking forward to having the time to just focus on the creation of the album and get it to the point of presentation.”

“I’m very much influenced by the things around me,” adds Nash. “I try to make a journey and a world people can be a part of.  What I love about music and making records is that people can be a part of that and it can be a shared experience.”

Israel Nash performs at Milkboy, 1100 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19107, Wednesday July 27, 2016 at 8:00 P.M. For further information call (215) 925-MILK or visit www.milkboyphilly.com.

To stay current with Israel Nash, visit www.israelnash.com.

http://www.montgomerynews.com/articles/2016/07/17/entertainment/doc5786458c1210e490444039.txt




Quilt Comes to Philly in Support of "Plaza" 7//17/16


Quilt Releases Pop Infused “Plaza”

By Rob Nagy

Out of New England comes the four-piece psychedelic indie rock band “Quilt.” Featuring Anna Fox Rochinski (vocals/guitars), Shane Butler (vocals/guitars), Keven Lareau (vocals/bass) and John Andrews (vocals/drums), Quilt’s latest album release “Plaza” (2016) represents the evolution of one of the more interesting bands to emerge in recent years.

Influenced by a variety of musical genres dating back to the late 60’s, Quilt delivers a polished presentation of their avant-garde style on “Plaza.” Offering what Andrews considers a selection of straight up pop, Plaza delivers a collection of well-crafted songs featuring tantalizing harmonies, cool guitar riffs and dreamy synthesizers. Standout tracks include “Passersby,”  “Searching For,” “O’Connors Barn,” “Something There,” “Padova”  “Your Island” and “Own Ways.”

“We thought, ‘how are we going to make a record while living so far apart?’” says Andrews, from his home in Barrington, New Hampshire. “We weren’t living near each other anymore. So we all flew to Atlanta, Georgia for about a month together and just worked on songs. Then we had a week in upstate New York when we finalized a lot of the songs before we went in the studio to record in Brooklyn New York. The last record was our first time working in a professional studio. Having had some experience, we got through the awkward part of figuring out what we were going to do in the studio. We were more comfortable this time. It was a fun time.”

“While every song is different, we all, for the most part, write together in one way or another,” adds Andrews. “We used to improv a lot, just jamming together and coming up with stuff that way. This time people wrote individual parts and we regrouped and we sat with them and worked together.  It was very much a collective effort between the four of us to write the songs.”

“As a songwriter, there’s a magical moment when a song that starts in your head becomes verbal when you’re singing it and then goes through a microphone and onto a record and back into the air and then goes into someone else’s head,” says Andrews. “It’s like this never ending stream of thought when people make or listen to music, and we’re all part of it.”

Formed in 2008 by Rochinski and Butler while the pair attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Quilt made its first SXSW festival appearance in 2010.  Following their “Agents of Play” EP release in 2010, the band was signed by Burger Records. Releasing their self-titled debut album in 2011 (which featured the single “Cowboys in the Void”), the record was later picked up and rereleased by Mexican Summer Records.

Garnering praise from critics and attention from indie music fans, Quilt followed up with a sophomore effort, “Held in Splendor,” in 2014.

Extensive touring throughout the U.S. and Canada found the band sharing the concert stage with “Young Magic,” “The Fresh & Onlys” and Laetitia Sadier. Quilt made its national television debut in the fall of 2015 by appearing on NBC’s late night entertainment program, "Last Call with Carson Daly.”

Rapidly becoming seasoned veterans of the road and the recording studio, Quilt’s merging of unique vocal harmonies, skilled musicianship, improvisation and visual presentation have resulted in a memorable live show and a growing cult following.

“We all sing,” says Andrews. “We all had our bands and projects before and we were all the singers of those bands.  So, it only made sense for us to all sing. I think we blend very well together.  We work a lot on harmonies. We try to incorporate what’s on the records, the songs that people recognize and hear. We also try to incorporate some jamming and improvisation. I know I can’t speak entirely for the group, but I’m a big Grateful Dead fan. They are the kings of the jam. It’s a balance between satisfying yourself and satisfying the audience. So jamming is a way of keeping the audience satisfied and keeping yourself satisfied. We also include a visual element to our show. It seems to work pretty well ‘cause everyone comments on how much they like the visuals.”

“I couldn’t be happier,” adds Andrews. “We’ve had a very gradual growth. We’ve been a band for a while. We put our time in playing shows to nobody and in basements and weird bars and stuff. We’d done that for a long time. We have a modest cult following. We’ve been able to support ourselves playing music and that’s the dream. We’re all very optimistic for the future.”

Quilt performs with special guest Mary Lattimore at the Fillmore (Foundry), 1000 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19125, Friday July 29, 2016 at 8:00 P.M. For further info or tickets, visit www.livenation.com.

To stay up to date with Quilt, visit www.quiltband.com.

The Black Crowes Rich Robinson Releases Solo Album 7/17/16


The Black Crowes’ Rich Robinson
thriving as a solo Artist

By Rob Nagy

“It’s never an easy decision to walk away from your life’s creation,” says Black Crowes guitarist and co-founder Rich Robinson, from New York City, referring to the official end of the group. “My whole adult life I was in that band making music and that’s what I did.  It afforded me a really cool life. You could see how people were moved by what we did. We would play songs and it would be a release and people would weep and you could see joy and connection. There’s nothing better on earth than that. That’s the whole point of being in a band.”

“As time went on,” adds Robinson, “For whatever reason, this power struggle ensued with Chris where he just wanted to take over and I really didn’t want to go where he was going. I didn’t believe in it, and that became very stressful. When the two people that were working in unison for years and knew what we could do together and all of a sudden that shifts, and he’s going down a road that I do not like at all musically where he’s coming from, and he didn’t like what I was doing -  it just got to this point where it was so stressful and miserable that we all hated making records.”

Formed in Marietta, Georgia with his brother, lead vocalist Chris Robinson, The Black Crowes earned critical praise and commercial success with the release of their Platinum selling debut album, “Shake Your Money Maker” (1990). The singles “Twice As Hard,” “Hard to Handle” and “She Talks to Angels” received heavy radio airplay. Their follow-up Platinum album, “The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion” (1992), featuring the hit single “Remedy,” became their highest charting album in the U.S. and abroad.

By the mid 90’s, the Black Crowes (who had continued to tour at a feverish pace, headlining shows and festivals in both Europe and Japan) reached the pinnacle of their commercial success. A loyal fan base continued to follow the band in spite of their declining popularity.

After the release of the album “Lions”(2001) and concert tour, the Black Crowes took an indefinite hiatus. Rich Robinson seized the opportunity to pursue solo and collaborative efforts, recording and performing with his bands Hookah Brown and Circle Sound.

In January 2005, Rich and Chris Robinson joined each other on stage for the first time since 2002, performing an acoustic show in Las Vegas.  In the months to come, the Robinson’s performed a series of concert dates, “Brother’s of a Feather,” capturing one of their shows at the Roxy in Los Angeles for a CD/DVD release.

Rumors that the Black Crowes were reuniting surfaced a couple of months later. The band then hit the concert trail, headlining throughout the U.S. and Canada, guest appearing with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and then at the Bonnaroo Music Festival. A late summer five night run at the Fillmore in San Francisco was captured on film and released as a live CD/ DVD, “Freak ‘n’ Roll Into The Fog” (2006).

On the surface, the future of the Black Crowes looked promising, yet internal dissension was growing within the band.

“Early on when we would make records,” says Robinson, “it was always great because our roles were defined. My role was music and Chris’ was lyrics, and that’s really how it went. And then the band came in and played what they played and they were such great players. It wasn’t until later when the horse---t would come in.”

“What contributed to the end of the Black Crowes was more like ego,” adds Robinson. “The environment was really negative - not the band.  It was coming from one source. It created a tremendous amount of negativity. To me, if you didn’t want to be in the band anymore and if you were bitter or whatever and you didn’t feel like it moved you anymore, I think you have to take into consideration the fans. Those people have been there with us the whole time and those people have an invested interest as well. Why not do at least a string of shows - one last tour and then just go away. Everyone would go into it knowing that this is done. Let’s have a celebration, not unlike “The Last Waltz.” So now it’s kind of freeing to be away from that and to just be in a more positive place.”

In spite of his disappointment over the demise of the Black Crowes, Robinson continues his journey of rebirth and discovery.

Robinson shines on his latest solo effort, “Flux” (Eagle Rock Entertainment, 2016). Offering a 13 song collection of what might be his finest solo work to date, Robinson is backed by a stellar line-up of musicians, including Matt Slocum (keys), Marco Benevento (keys), Danny Mitchell (keys) Zak Gabbard (bass), Joe Magistro (drums/percussion), and vocalists John Hogg and Danielia Cotton. “Music That Will Lift Me” is the record’s first single.  The album showcases Robinson’s ability to deliver straight ahead rock and roll as well as emotionally charged, heart felt, thought provoking composition. Other stand-out tracks include “The Upstairs Land,” “Everything’s Alright,” “Life,”  “Astral” and “Time to Leave.”

“I think it’s a progression, the next step,” says Robinson. “I really didn’t go in with anything.  I just had parts.  I’m thinking, ‘Well, I want to use the energy of the studio.’ We went ahead and just started doing it. I love the concept of flushing out these things while they’re happening. To me, the process is seeing this one small piece of music and then literally throughout the day seeing where it goes. Trying different beats, different riffs, adding this and that, and it’s really cool.  I like to work with broad strokes and also with feeling.  ‘How does this make me feel? Where is this going?” Those are the things that I really look at when I write. We get in there and really just do it and there’s really nothing better than that.”

Robinson, who currently splits his time by playing guitar for Bad Company on their 2016 U.S. co-headlining tour with Joe Walsh, is excited to perform songs off his latest release on his own solo concert dates.

“I’m really looking forward to getting out and playing and doing my thing,” says Robinson. “I really love my records and I love playing them live, and I really love my band. There are really no decisions to be made.  We just get out there and play. It doesn’t have to be anything. It’s just there in front of us. It’s like when we’re in the studio. ‘Hey what do you think? What’s your part going to be?’ It’s just normal back and forth. We’re all there for one purpose - to play this music.”

“It’s been a few years of trying to convince people that I’m not trying to be the Black Crowes,” adds Robinson. “Crowes fans tend to want the Black Crowes. It can open some doors, but it can also shut them as well when people just want the Crowes. So there are pros and cons. It would be just really cool to have people come out and check us out and give it a chance. I think it’s good and hopefully you’ll like it.”

Rich Robinson will perform at the Sellersville Theater; located at 24 West Temple Ave., Sellersville, PA, Thursday July 28, 2016 at 8:00 P.M. Tickets can be purchased by calling 215-257-5808 or on-line at www.st94.com.

To stay up to date with Rich Robinson visit www.richrobinson.net.

Thursday, July 7, 2016

THE LAST SHOW AT PHILLY'S JFK STADIUM

I was there were you?

http://thekey.xpn.org/2016/07/07/the-grateful-dead-jfk-stadium/

Sunday, July 3, 2016

PAUL McCARTNEY SNUBS FANS

For what the world has given Paul McCartney he owes fans a picture on an autograph once in a while.