Thursday, April 30, 2015

LISA FISCHER AND GRAND BATON PUT ON AN AMAZING PERFORMANCE AT THE KESWICK THEATRE IN GLENSIDE, PA 4/30/15




Lisa Fischer at the Keswick Theatere TONIGHT!


Lisa Fischer Brings Her Solo Tour to the Keswick Theatre
By Rob Nagy

When Lisa Fischer won the 1992 Grammy Award for “Best Female R&B Performance” for her hit single “How Can I Ease the Pain” (from her debut album “So Intense”), a successful career as a solo artist seemed within reach.
As often is the case in the world of music, the spotlight shifted. Fischer lost her record deal and was relegated to the ranks of back-up singer.
Fischer has worked with The Rolling Stones (a gig she has had since the late 80’s), Sting, Tina Turner, Luther Vandross, Chris Botti and many more.  That experience, fueled by genuine talent and tenacity, led Fischer to evolve into one of the most highly touted, in-demand back-up vocalists in music.
“Doing background for different groups, you’re kind of a chameleon, and you kind of fit into their vision,” says Fischer from Nova Scotia, while on tour. “(You are) a person that is a part of this beautiful tapestry that they offer to the audience with their own vision of what it is they’re trying to put across. It was beautiful to be like a piece of clay.  I could just kind of mold and be myself vocally, but change color and paint according to what was needed in each situation.”

“Each artist is a boss,” adds Fischer. “I hopefully embrace everything that they are and everything that they present to you. So, if they’re having a good day, if they’re having a bad day, a stressful day, a happy day or a sad day, you support and love the people you work with. That’s what you do. That’s part of the joy of the support. You look at each person and at what their needs are in that moment. For me, I really enjoy that role.”
After being somewhat mired in obscurity as a supporting performer, the release of Morgan Neville’s Oscar and Grammy-winning documentary “Twenty Feet From Stardom” in 2013 brought Fischer center stage and jump-started a solo career that had felt out of reach. Fischer shined in this real life portrait of life as a back-up singer.
“I didn’t know what to think of it to be honest,” says Lisa Fischer.  “I was just quietly doing my thing. I thought it was really sweet that a background singer’s life was interesting enough to make a documentary. So, I was just kind of blown away by the whole thing.”
“During the filming, there was so much going on, and life was just so real at that point,” adds Fischer. “I was just so exhausted and in a place where I needed to embrace where I was in the present moment and try not to be anything except what I was. I had to be me. I was a bit nervous about what that was going to be, but I just went forward and said, ‘OK, this is who I am, and this is what it is, and I just have to learn how to love and embrace that.’”

“It’s given me a second chance at just being able to sing a song from beginning to end as opposed to bits and pieces in a background sense,” says Fischer. “It has been really beautiful, kind of a full circle for me. It has been amazing.”

Now in her 50’s and enjoying her personal life and her music career on her terms, Fischer is quietly basking in the glory of being authentic. No glitz for this unassuming soft-spoken treasure whose voice can pull on your heart strings one minute and rock the house the next.

“I just feel like I need to embrace my natural self as much as possible,” says Fischer. “It’s like the petals of a rose with how it unfolds, and you get the different scents and the different feel. Sometimes the petal is dry, and sometimes it’s full of moisture, and it is what it is. I enjoy all of the unfolding at different times according to what it is. All of these things have their place, but I think because I’ve had so much of it in my history, I just felt like I needed to embrace something else.”

Fronting her own new band and currently on her second solo tour, Fischer continues to embrace the music and the fans that support her.

“I want people to come and just be present in the experience,” says Fischer, “- to get sort of lost and found again in the music and to just experience a timelessness in the music - whatever that’s going to be.”

“There’s something about Christmas for me. When I was a kid, I would hope for a million and one things, but you never know what’s in the box until you kick it around, shake it around and open it. Not that I think the show is a Christmas gift.  It’s just that ‘not knowingness’ of what’s inside a person and just allowing it to unfold, to just be present in that experience. What I’m hoping people will take away with them is just a sense of joy, peace and fun.”

Honored by the accolades and the notoriety that continue to find their way to her door, Fischer feels blessed to be making a living following her passion.

“I just love singing so much, and I love the melodies,” says Fischer. “The melodies are like this map, and they move and they wind and they go to places and they sort of come back and they hang out. It’s all these experiences. I think something about the freedom of what melodies mean to me is that they mold the experience for me. The music is really the artist, and the melody is really the art. I’m just sort of riding that wave.”

Lisa Fischer and Grand Baton performs at the Keswick Theatre, located at 291 North Keswick Ave., Glenside, PA 19038, Thursday April 30, 2015 at 8:00 P.M. Tickets can be ordered by calling (215) 572-7650 or on-line at www.keswicktheatre.com.

To stay up to date with Lisa Fischer visit www.lisafischermusic.com

Monday, April 27, 2015

JON BON JOVI HELPS THE HOMELESS


 It was one year ago that Jon Bon Jovi paid a visit to Camden, New Jersey's Joseph;s House, an organization that he generously supports!

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

RUMER IN PHILLY



 
World Café Welcomes Rumer  
Back to Philly

By Rob Nagy


The classic sound of the 70’s returned to Philadelphia recently, when U.K. artist Rumer (a/k/a Sarah Joyce) played the main stage at World Café Live.

In support of her latest album release, “Into Colour” (2014), Rumer performed a 75-minute set of some of the most melodic and upbeat music to emerge over the past decade.

Performing songs from Into Colour (a set that included “Dangerous,” “You Just Don’t Know People,” “Baby Come Back to Bed,” “Play Your Guitar,” “Better Place,” “Pizza and Pinball” and “I Am Blessed”), Rumer also paid homage to hometown music heroes Hall & Oates and Todd Rundgren with renditions of “I Can’t Go For That” and “Love is the Answer.” 

A predominantly middle-aged audience hung on every note as Rumer, often compared vocally to the late Karen Carpenter, transported her fans back to a time heralded by many as “the greatest decade in modern music.”

Seemingly touched by the welcome reception she received from the Philly fans, Rumer expressed her gratitude throughout the show to the faithful that didn’t let the stormy weather or an early in the week work night deter their attendance.

Flawless in her vocal delivery and backed by a band that nailed the evening’s selections, Rumer was engaging and genuine. 

For fans of traditional vocalists, Rumer is a breath of fresh air. Undoubtedly poised for even greater success, it will be interesting to watch this new star rise.

To stay up to date with Rumer, visit www.rumer.co.uk

Thursday, April 16, 2015

CENTER CITY JAZZ FEST IN PHILLY 4/25/15



The “Center City Jazz Festival”

returns to Philly

By Rob Nagy





In honor of “Jazz Appreciation Month,” Philadelphia welcomes the return of the fourth annual “Center City Jazz Festival.” 
The Festival will feature some of the finest musicians in the local, regional and international jazz community. Chris’ Jazz Café, Fergie’s Pub, Franky Bradley’s, Milkboy Philadelphia and Time restaurant will play host to this year’s roster of talent.

“There’s a very cooperative spirit in Philadelphia among venue owners, restaurant owners and artists that really drives me to want to produce festivals and shows,” says Center City Jazz Festival director and trombonist Ernest Stuart, from his home in South Philadelphia.
 

“Philadelphia is all about soul. The music is about something different here. It’s about expressing soul - even the jazz.  It’s always been about playing soulfully within the many genres.  That’s one thing that Philadelphia does very well.”

“The first festival in 2012 was great. A lot of support came for the idea. It was unbelievable, the energy and the interest. Last year, we sold out. Everyone has been so supportive of it and continues to really enjoy it.”

"This one is going to be our most diverse line-up ever,” adds Stuart. “I'm extremely happy to present this mix of artists and music. A handful of the festival's bands have never performed in Philly before. Everyone is in for an awesome surprise."

The six-hour festival, presented by Fifth City Productions, the Wyncote Foundation, and the Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy, will feature 19 acts, including performances by Bootsie Barnes, Ben Schachter & Re:Trio, Dahud El-Bakara Sextet, Dena Underwood, Ernest Stuart, Fresh Cut Orchestra, Greg Snyder, The Huntertones, Matt Davis' Aerial Photograph, Max Swan, Surface to Air, Tomas Fujiwara, and the West Philadelphia Orchestra. 



 Stuart is excited to be joining this year’s musical line-up for the first time since the festival’s inaugural year.

“It just seemed a good time to perform in it again,” says Stuart. “The first year, I thought that I had to prove to people I was a natural musician and not somebody who just decided to put a festival together. For the next two years, I didn’t play at all.” 



“It’s fun to experience the festival from this perspective as opposed to just producing,” adds Stuart. “This seemed like a good thing to do.”

 Driven by a passion to play the saxophone at age twelve, Stuart’s desire to be a musician nearly ended before it began. Raised by his mother, a single parent, the economics of acquiring the instrument and getting lessons were out of reach for his struggling family.


By switching to the more accessible trombone in a beginners music class at school, Stuart was able to satisfy his creative expression.


Attending South Jersey’s Pennsauken High School, (Class of 2002), Stuart delved into classical music by funding lessons with a part-time job.



“By the tine I got to high school, I knew that I was going to play music for the rest of my life,” recalls Stuart. “It was just a matter of how I was going to pull it off. I don’t know how to explain it.  I just connected with music on a level that, at that point, I’d never connected with anything. By the time I finished the 9th grade, I was so serious about it that I got my first job at McDonalds so that I could afford to pay for trombone lessons.”



Stuart’s commitment to his art paid off.  A participant in high profile district orchestras and the recipient of awards in area jazz competitions, Stuart enrolled at Temple University.



After studying under Luis Bonilla, an internationally recognized jazz trombonist, composer and arranger, whom Stuart credits for “changing my life,” the foundation was in place for the burgeoning talent of this young artist.



While at Temple, Stuart was making a name for himself in the Philly music scene. Displaying an ability to excel at a variety of musical genres - jazz, salsa, R&B, soul, rock and hip hop - he found work with “The Roots,” Jaguar Wright, John Swana, Jimmy Jorge and the Latin Express and the O’Jays, among others.



Following his graduation from Temple in 2008, Stuart relocated to New York City for a time. He performed at the legendary Village Vanguard, The Iridium, Smoke and the Blue Note with The Duke Ellington Orchestra, The Village Vanguard Orchestra, Reggie Workman and Terrell Stafford. Stuart was rapidly gaining experience and exposure as a working musician.



“Learning at Temple from the people that I learned from was great,” says Stuart. “I’ve gotten a lot accomplished since graduating. I’m glad I took advantage of the resources that were available to me. We had Professors Terrell Stafford and Luis Bonilla that also performed with the Village Vanguard Jazz Orchestra. So, all of these musicians were coming down from New York for these gigs and going back up to perform. Any chance I got, I would go and see them perform regularly up in New York. They eventually called me to play with the band after I graduated. That was instrumental in my development. I would not have done that if I hadn’t gone to Temple.”




Currently touring with a band out of Brooklyn called “Red Baraat,” Stuart is releasing his latest solo EP, “Same Walking Animals,” later this month.


“The music on the album shouldn’t be labeled as any one thing,” says Stuart. “I really don’t know what music I subscribe to or what my genre is. I don’t know if I identify with any one thing. I like rock, classical, jazz, soul. It’s all improvisational, and I like it all.”



“I think we get in the habit of calling all improvisational music jazz,” adds Stuart. “Jazz is such a wide-open term. I think its beauty is in the eye of the beholder. If people hear my music and call it jazz, then cool.  If people hear it and call it rock, then cool. I’m not trying to create any of that stuff. I’m just trying to create something that is honest.”



The Fourth Annual Center City Jazz Festival is on Saturday, April 25 from 1:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M. Venues: Chris' Jazz Cafe, Fergie's Pub, Franky Bradley's, Milkboy Philadelphia and Time Restaurant. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 day of show. One ticket provides access to all performances. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.ccjazzfest.com.



To stay up to date with Ernest Stuart visit www.erneststuart.com



Tuesday, April 14, 2015

LEGENDARY BACK-UP VOCALIST LISA FISCHER


Lisa Fischer Brings Her Solo Tour 
to the Keswick Theatre


By Rob Nagy


When Lisa Fischer won the 1992 Grammy Award for “Best Female R&B Performance” for her hit single “How Can I Ease the Pain” (from her debut album “So Intense”), a successful career as a solo artist seemed within reach. 


As often is the case in the world of music, the spotlight shifted. Fischer lost her record deal and was relegated to the ranks of back-up singer.
Fischer has worked with The Rolling Stones (a gig she has had since the late 80’s), Sting, Tina Turner, Luther Vandross, Chris Botti and many more.  That experience, fueled by genuine talent and tenacity, led Fischer to evolve into one of the most highly touted, in-demand back-up vocalists in music.


“Doing background for different groups, you’re kind of a chameleon, and you kind of fit into their vision,” says Fischer from Nova Scotia, while on tour. “(You are) a person that is a part of this beautiful tapestry that they offer to the audience with their own vision of what it is they’re trying to put across. It was beautiful to be like a piece of clay.  I could just kind of mold and be myself vocally, but change color and paint according to what was needed in each situation.”



“Each artist is a boss,” adds Fischer. “I hopefully embrace everything that they are and everything that they present to you. So, if they’re having a good day, if they’re having a bad day, a stressful day, a happy day or a sad day, you support and love the people you work with. That’s what you do. That’s part of the joy of the support. You look at each person and at what their needs are in that moment. For me, I really enjoy that role.”

After being somewhat mired in obscurity as a supporting performer, the release of Morgan Neville’s Oscar and Grammy-winning documentary “Twenty Feet From Stardom” in 2013 brought Fischer center stage and jump-started a solo career that had felt out of reach. Fischer shined in this real life portrait of life as a back-up singer.

“I didn’t know what to think of it to be honest,” says Lisa Fischer.  “I was just quietly doing my thing. I thought it was really sweet that a background singer’s life was interesting enough to make a documentary. So, I was just kind of blown away by the whole thing.”


“During the filming, there was so much going on, and life was just so real at that point,” adds Fischer. “I was just so exhausted and in a place where I needed to embrace where I was in the present moment and try not to be anything except what I was. I had to be me. I was a bit nervous about what that was going to be, but I just went forward and said, ‘OK, this is who I am, and this is what it is, and I just have to learn how to love and embrace that.’”



“It’s given me a second chance at just being able to sing a song from beginning to end as opposed to bits and pieces in a background sense,” says Fischer. “It has been really beautiful, kind of a full circle for me. It has been amazing.”



 Now in her 50’s and enjoying her personal life and her music career on her terms, Fischer is quietly basking in the glory of being authentic. No glitz for this unassuming soft-spoken treasure whose voice can pull on your heart strings one minute and rock the house the next.


“I just feel like I need to embrace my natural self as much as possible,” says Fischer. “It’s like the petals of a rose with how it unfolds, and you get the different scents and the different feel. Sometimes the petal is dry, and sometimes it’s full of moisture, and it is what it is. I enjoy all of the unfolding at different times according to what it is. All of these things have their place, but I think because I’ve had so much of it in my history, I just felt like I needed to embrace something else.”



Fronting her own new band and currently on her second solo tour, Fischer continues to embrace the music and the fans that support her.



“I want people to come and just be present in the experience,” says Fischer, “- to get sort of lost and found again in the music and to just experience a timelessness in the music - whatever that’s going to be.”



“There’s something about Christmas for me. When I was a kid, I would hope for a million and one things, but you never know what’s in the box until you kick it around, shake it around and open it. Not that I think the show is a Christmas gift.  It’s just that ‘not knowingness’ of what’s inside a person and just allowing it to unfold, to just be present in that experience. What I’m hoping people will take away with them is just a sense of joy, peace and fun.”



Honored by the accolades and the notoriety that continue to find their way to her door, Fischer feels blessed to be making a living following her passion.



“I just love singing so much, and I love the melodies,” says Fischer. “The melodies are like this map, and they move and they wind and they go to places and they sort of come back and they hang out. It’s all these experiences. I think something about the freedom of what melodies mean to me is that they mold the experience for me. The music is really the artist, and the melody is really the art. I’m just sort of riding that wave.”



Lisa Fischer and Grand Baton perform at the Keswick Theatre, located at 291 North Keswick Ave., Glenside, PA 19038, Thursday April 30, 2015 at 8:00 P.M. Tickets can be ordered by calling (215) 572-7650 or on-line at www.keswicktheatre.com.



To stay up to date with Lisa Fischer visit www.lisafischermusic.com

Sunday, April 5, 2015

HAPPY EASTER!


PROFESSOR LOUIE AND THE CROWMATIX



Professor Louie and the Crowmatix
bring their Americana Roots to Sellersville

By Rob Nagy

 Offering a unique blend of blues, rock, R&B, folk and gospel that can best be categorized as Americana roots music, “Professor Louie and the Crowmatix” are leaving their mark.
The brainchild of seasoned musician, songwriter and producer Louie Hurwitz, aka Professor Louie, the group was initially conceived as a back-up band during Hurwitz’s tenure with Rock and Roll Hall of Famers “The Band.”
 
Tagged Professor Louie by The Band’s Rick Danko, Hurwitz was enlisted to co-produce, engineer and perform on The Band’s last three albums, “Jericho (1993),” “High on the Hog” (1996) and “Jubilation” (1998). His work with The Band went beyond the studio, encompassing TV and radio shows as well as solo projects with Levon Helm, Rick Danko and Garth Hudson.

“When I was working with ‘The Band’,” recalls Hurwitz from his home in Hurley, New York,  “especially when we got a record deal and had to put together a new song, a lot of times those guys would be on the road. So, I would pick the best musicians in the area and put together some demos of the songs I thought might work for The Band.”

“Rick Danko, bass player for The Band, and I were doing some solo shows,” adds Hurwitz. “- Just the two of us, and he said, ‘let’s get a band together.’ All of us lived around Woodstock, N.Y. We all shared various sessions together with artists, and we kept seeing each other. So, he said, ‘why don’t we use some of the guys we’ve been using in the studio with The Band?’ So, The Crowmatix started as a demo band for The Band as well as backing for Garth Hudson, the Commander Cody Band and Michael Falzarano of Hot Tuna and New Riders of the Purple Sage.”

The tragic death of Rick Danko in 1999 brought the curtain to a close on The Band. Hurwitz and the Crowmatix had a decision to make.

“When Rick passed and The Band world ended,” recalls Hurwitz, “the Crowmatix said, ‘let’s get together and keep playing.’ So, we started playing shows, and we had a tremendous reception from people when we played, which has kept “Professor Louie and the Crowmatix” working all the time.”

“(By) playing live and travelling together so much, we’ve developed our own sound,” says Hurwitz. “Through the evolution of us performing, our songs have become known, as opposed to music you put on the radio and everybody comes to see you because they heard it on the radio. Thankfully, people continue to come out to hear us and have a good time.”

After the release of their debut album “Over the Edge” in 2000, Professor Louie and the Crowmatix rapidly built a following in the U.S., Canada and Europe while working everything from folk clubs to festivals.

Featuring a line-up of seasoned musicians, each with his or her own impressive list of musical accomplishments, Professor Louie and the Crowmatix includes Louie Hurwitz (Hammond organ, keyboards, vocals, accordion), Miss Marie Spinosa (vocals, percussion, piano), Gary Burke (drums), Frank Campbell (bass, vocals) and Josh Colow (guitar, vocals). The band has recently wrapped up its latest recording, “Music From Hurley Mountain.”

“It’s original songs and a few older cover songs,” says Hurwitz. “It’s about our area here in Hurley, N.Y. It’s an old farming area with old families and a strip of thousands and thousands of acres. We just decided to write a record about all these people that have helped us out in our local area. We really go back to the well of the roots of Americana music. It’s based in country, blues, rock and roll and everything in between. I’m looking forward to playing it live and seeing the reaction.”

The past decade has garnered Professor Louie and the Crowmatix significant praise and notoriety on a global scale.

Partnering with the New York State Museum, the band released the live album “The Spirit of Woodstock” in 2006 to coincide with the Museum’s exhibit and concert series, “Sprit of the Woodstock Generation.”

That same year, the band was featured on the CBS T.V. special “Melodies Of Christmas.” Performing their award winning song “Melody Of Peace,” they helped raise more than $5,000,000 for The Children’s Hospital at Albany Medical Hospital.

The 2007 release of Professor Louie’s instructional DVD “Rock and Blues Accordion” led him to tour Novosibirsk, Siberia, Russia, where he taught students English through American music. His experiences there were captured in the documentary “Woodstock-Siberia Blues Express.”

Inducted into The Southern Canadian Blues Hall of Fame in Windsor, Ontario in 2010, Professor Louie was recognized for his solo accomplishments as well as his work with the Crowmatix.

As the group’s leader, Hurwitz is quick to recognize the collective creative diversity and showmanship that defines “Professor Louie and the Crowmatix.”

“The group keeps evolving,” says Hurwitz. “There is nothing else like it out there. When people come to see the Crowmatix, they get a great variety of music. They’ll hear some original songs. They’ll hear some really old folk music. They’ll hear some great blues songs, and they’ll hear some great music of The Band songs. People get a really great show, and the musicianship is impeccable. As long as the public keeps supporting us,” adds Hurwitz. “I can’t complain about anything.”

Professor Louie and the Crowmatix perform at the Sellersville Theater; located at 24 West Temple Ave., Sellersville, PA, on Wednesday April 15, 2015 at 8:00 P.M. Tickets can be purchased by calling 215-257-5808 or on-line at www.st94.com.

To stay up to date with Professor Louie and the Crowmatix, visit www.professorlouie.com

Thursday, April 2, 2015

ALEX BUGNON


 

Swiss Pianist Alex Bugnon returns
to the Berks Jazz Fest

By Rob Nagy


A musical presence on the contemporary jazz scene for over two decades, pianist and composer Alex Bugnon is flourishing as both a solo artist and highly regarded sideman.

“What I do is a continuation of the true contemporary jazz that was thriving in the 70’s,” says Bugnon, from his home in New York City. “It’s just a continuation of that movement, which used to incorporate everything that was available -fusion, jazz, rock, straight ahead, intricate melodies or chords, but with a nice feel that was accessible to people as far as the beat or the melody. That’s what I’m trying to do.”

“The thing that continues to drive me is the music that hasn’t been written,” adds Bugnon. “It’s always interesting to me - what am I going to do next? It‘s a challenge, and it’s exciting.”


As follow-up to his 2013 album “Harlem,” Bugnon is delving into recording a collection of new releases around his hectic performance schedule.

“I’m working on very ambitious projects,” says Bugnon. “I’m going to try to do three records - one Christmas, one solo with some duets and a regular record, the funky kind of thing that I usually do. I am hoping to have them out by the fall of this year.”

Citing Herbie Hancock, McCoy Tyner and Keith Jarrett as a sampling of his greatest musical influences, Bugnon himself graduated from the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston.

Relocating to New York City, where he earned a humble living driving a taxi and teaching French, Bugnon earned a stellar reputation while backing artists Patti Austin, James Ingram, Freddie Jackson, Melba Moore, Keith Sweat and Najee.

Signed to a recording contract with Orpheus Records, Bugnon released his debut album “Love Season” in 1989 to rave reviews and won a Black Radio Exclusive award for “Best New Jazz Artist.”

A switch to Sony’s Epic Records in the early 90’s led to continued critical praise and commercial success.  Bugnon’s work reached the Top 40 R&B charts with the albums “107 Degrees in the Shade” (1991) and “This Time Around” (1993), the former winning a “Soul Train Award.”

Acclaimed producer and founder of Mosaic Records Michael Cuscuna partnered with Bugnon in 2007 to release a comprehensive compilation of selections from Bugnon’s discography. 

One of the jazz community’s hardest working and busiest musicians, Bugnon maintains a loyal following on multiple continents.

There are definitely some people who cannot get arrested in America and others who can’t get arrested in Europe,” says Bugnon.  “Sometimes you have to choose a camp.”

“In America, it seems that the music scene has been hijacked by smooth jazz, but not everywhere,” adds Bugnon. “I’m very proud that my songs have never been chosen to be in this play list (laughs).”

“Then there is another extreme - that is the ultra conservative, ultra reactionary straight ahead movement that goes all the way back to Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington. Then you have people in the middle, like me. I still enjoy a pretty big following in America dating to the pre-smooth jazz radio days. I also do well in Europe”

“My thing is that I like to incorporate straight ahead fusion, gospel, everything in my style,” says Bugnon. “I will never give into a radio formula just so I can be played on the radio. I would never do that. I could not wake-up and be happy with myself.”

Bugnon is looking forward to joining an all-star line-up at this year’s 25th anniversary “Berks Jazz Fest.”

“The Berks Jazz Fest is the best festival I can think of in the States, because it has everyone there,” says Bugnon. “It showcases lots of different styles.  It’s not just one style. I think Berks is doing the right thing. It’s really a nice showcase of how music should be. It’s a very important stop to me.”

“When people come to see me, I want them to have fun and enjoy the music that I play,” adds Bugnon. “I want them to be able to hear some of the history of jazz. I like to quote a lot of older music.  I tell my fans every night, ‘Thank you for being here. If you weren’t here to hear me play, I wouldn’t exist. I would not be able to do what I do.’ We create the music, but they are our patrons. So we have to treat them as such.”

Alex Bugnon performs at the Berks Jazz Fest Friday April 17, 2015 at 7:00 P.M. The festival runs from April 10 to April 19, 2015. For a complete list of concerts, venues and ticket information, visit www.berksjazzfest.com.

To stay up to date with Alex Bugnon, visit www.alexbugnon.com.